Master of Arts Program

The MA is designed to prepare students from diverse backgrounds to become Jewish educators. Students design their course of study by choosing one of two areas of concentration: Day School Teaching or Educational Leadership in Synagogues and Communal Settings. The program accommodates full- and part-time students and online learners. All students admitted to the MA program enroll in a core curriculum that provides a solid grounding in Judaica and education.

Admissions Procedures

The Davidson School accepts and reviews applications for admission and merit fellowships on a rolling basis. The priority application and fellowship deadline is March 1 of each year. It is in the applicant's best interest to apply as early as possible because space in the class fills up—and funding, though merit-based, is awarded on a first-come, first-served basis. Full-time matriculated students are only accepted in the fall. For more information about admission deadlines and fellowships, please consult the Admissions page and Merit Fellowships and Financial Aid Page.

Matriculated Students

An applicant for admission as a degree candidate must submit the following:

  • A completed online application form together with the $65 fee
  • An official transcript of academic records from all colleges and universities previously attended
  • Official scores of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE)
  • Three letters of recommendation, two of which should be academic

View the application and apply now.

JTS alumni should email the Office of the Registrar and copy edschool@jtsa.edu to authorize access to their JTS academic files. Please include your degree and date of graduation.

Nonmatriculated Students

The Davidson School accepts and reviews nonmatriculation applications on a rolling basis until the beginning of each semester. It is in the applicant's best interest to apply as early as possible so that there is space remaining in courses. View the Academic Calendar.

Matriculated students have a priority in course registration over nonmatriculated students.

An applicant must submit the following:

  • A completed nonmatriculation application form
  • Official college transcript(s) indicating receipt of a bachelor's degree
  • An application fee of $35 payable to JTS

Download the nonmatriculated student application.

JTS alumni should email the Office of the Registrar and copy edschool@jtsa.edu to authorize access to their JTS academic files. Please include your degree and date of graduation.

Funding

Upon completion of his/her studies at JTS, the student is expected to work in a Jewish educational setting for one year for each year awarded a fellowship, for a maximum of three years.

  • All information about any other funding received for the period of the fellowship should be reported to the Dean's Office. The Davidson School reserves the right to adjust the amount of the award based upon other grants you may receive.
  • A yearly extension of the fellowship will be granted for a maximum of two years beyond the first year, provided funds are available and students are in good academic standing for each semester they are enrolled at The Davidson School.

MA Degree Requirements

The MA curriculum is designed to provide all students with a strong foundation in Judaica and education, in addition to fostering religious development and personal growth. Unless indicated, all courses are assigned three academic credits.

In order to meet graduation requirements, a student must earn a minimum of 46 credits above any course work needed to complete the Hebrew requirement and the prerequisites in Judaic Studies listed below. Hebrew requirements and prequisites for Judaic courses differ depending on the student's area of concentration. View the MA course grid (PDF).

In the first year, each MA Davidson School student is assigned a program advisor with whom the student will make decisions regarding course work, internships, and practicum placements appropriate to his or her future career goals. The different areas of the curriculum are listed below.

Full-time students at The Davidson School take 12 credits or more per semester. Part-time students take minimum of 6 credits per semester.

1. Prerequisite Courses in Jewish Education

The following courses in Judaic studies are prerequisites and do not count toward MA credit:

  • BIB 5012: Survey of the Pentateuch
  • BIB 5011: Introduction to Bible
  • TAL 5025: Introduction to Rabbinic Literature or equivalent course
  • MDS 5102: Classics of the Jewish Tradition II

If a student has previously taken a comparable course for credit at an accredited college or university, the student can request to be exempted from any or all of these courses by consulting with the associate dean of The Davidson School.

2. Hebrew Requirements

All entering students are required to take the Hebrew placement examination administered by the Hebrew Language faculty.

In order to receive their degree, students who choose the Day School Teaching concentration must demonstrate proficiency in Hebrew (speaking, reading, and writing) equivalent to the level of HEB 5301: Advanced Hebrew I. In addition, they need to take HEB 5117: Hebrew Fluency. Students concentrating in Day School Teaching are encouraged to participate in Ivriyon during one of its summer sessions.

In order to receive their degree, students who choose the Educational Leadership in Synagogues and Communal Settings concentration must demonstrate proficiency equivalent to the level of HEB 5203: Intermediate Hebrew II.

3. Judaica (15 credits)

All students are required to take:

  • EDU/PHI 5525: Translating Jewish Theology in Educational Settings
  • EDU 5013: Parshanut to be taken concurrently with EDU 5031: Pedagogic Skills
  • Three Judaica electives

Students in the Day School Teaching concentration are required to take the following course or an equivalent as one of their electives:

  • TAL 5026: A Thematic Introduction to the Talmud

Students in the other concentration may take any Judaica electives, and are not required to take Talmud electives.

4. Education (19 credits)

All students are required to enroll in the following four courses:

  • EDU 5031: Pedagogic Skills (This course should be taken concurrently with EDU 5013: Parshanut.) View more information about the course here (PDF).
  • SEM 5005: First Year Seminar—Becoming a Jewish Educational Professional
  • EDU 5116: Developmental Issues in Jewish Education
  • EDU 5158: Curriculum and Program Implementation

In addition, students in the Day School Teaching concentration and Educational Leadership in Synagogues and Communal Settings concentration must take two education electives at the 5000 level (taking doctoral level courses [8000 level] requires permission of the Dean's Office).

5. Practicum

Students are required to complete a two-semester practicum consisting of an academic class and 16 hours per week of placement for the Day School Teaching concentration or 10 hours per week for the Educational Leadership in Synagogues and Communal Settings concentration. The practicum takes place within the student's area of concentration. Practicum placements are arranged only by the faculty practicum coordinators. Students receive a stipend during the two semesters of the practicum.

Students are required to successfully complete the following courses before enrolling in the practicum of their choice.

  • EDU 5031: Pedagogic Skills
  • EDU 5127: Foundations of Jewish Education or SEM 5005: First Year Seminar
  • EDU 5116: Developmental Issues in Jewish Education
  • EDU 5158: Curriculum and Program Implementation

The Educational Leadership in Synagogues and Communal Settings and the Day School Teaching concentrations have additional courses that must be taken prior to or concurrently with the practicum, as detailed below.

Online Practicum

Students who hold a full-time position and are unable to be placed in a practicum site take an online practicum. Students register to EDU 5513D in the fall, and EDU 5514D in the spring.

Students are required to successfully complete the following courses before enrolling in the practicum of their choice.

  • EDU 5031: Pedagogic Skills
  • EDU 5127: Foundation of Jewish Education
  • EDU 5116: Developmental Issues in Jewish Education
  • EDU 5158: Curriculum and Program Implementation

Through the online practicum, students choose an aspect of practice around which to develop an in-depth investigation, using an action research framework. Action research is a reflective research process used as a tool to promote action taking in the service of educational improvement. It calls upon practitioners as insider experts to investigate research questions developed from their own concerns, and to focus these efforts around planning, implementing, and evaluating a change effort, thus enhancing leadership skills. Students plan and facilitate a change effort in their home institutions.  

In the first semester of the course, students concentrate on developing a research question, writing a literature review, and completing a research design. In the second semester, students implement the project, collect data, and evaluate the action. Throughout the course, students are engaged in online conversation with their classmates in full and small groups to examine examples of action research. They act as a community of practice to share their progress and to offer feedback throughout the different stages of the process.

6. Areas of Concentration

Students are required to choose one of the following two areas of concentration:

Day School Teaching (12 credits)

This concentration prepares students for day-school teaching positions. Students are required to take two of the following three classes:

  • EDU 5159: Theory and Practice of Hebrew Language Instruction in Jewish Educational Settings or a suitable methods/pedagogy substitution
  • HEB 5117: Hebrew Fluency

Students are encouraged to participate in Ivriyon during one of the summers they are in residency. For more information consult the main page for Ivriyon: Hebrew Immersion Institute for Day School Educators.

During the second or third year of the program, students participate in a yearlong student-teaching placement and weekly seminar (EDU 5312–5313). This practicum, designed in collaboration with participating day schools in the metropolitan area, consists of 16 hours of fieldwork per week throughout the academic year. In conjunction with the student-teaching placement, a student is assigned a mentor and a supervisor.

Educational Leadership in Synagogues and Communal Settings (12 credits)

The concentration prepares Davidson School students to become outstanding educational leaders who will serve a changing American Jewish community in the 21st century. Students in the Educational Leadership in Synagogues and Communal Settings concentration make the transition from expert learners to novice professionals in a collegial setting that supports the development of relationships, exposes them to practice in the field through internships, and provides mentoring with outstanding practitioners. This concentration builds a vibrant community of practice that supports individual and collective growth, and creates an emerging cadre of reflective Jewish educational leaders.

In addition to the education courses listed above, students on the Educational Leadership in Synagogues and Congregational Settings concentration are required to enroll in:

  • EDU 5609: Leading and Managing Jewish Nonprofits or EDU 8610: Executive Leadership for Nonprofit Organizations: Theory and Practice
  • EDU 5559: Staff Development and Supervision in Jewish Educational Settings

During the second or third year of the program, students participate in a yearlong field placement and weekly seminar (EDU 5513–5514). This practicum, designed with participating organizations in the metropolitan area, consists of 10 hours of fieldwork per week throughout the academic year.

The following courses must be completed prior to the practicum:

  • EDU 5031: Pedagogic Skills
  • EDU 5158: Curriculum and Instruction

The following courses must be completed prior to or concurrent with the practicum:

  • EDU 5609: Leading and Managing Jewish Nonprofits or EDU 8610: Executive Leadership for Nonprofit Organizations: Theory and Practice
  • EDU 5559: Staff Development and Supervision in Jewish Educational Settings

7. Graduation with Honors

In order to graduate with honors, students must fulfill the following requirements*:

  • Register for EDU 5314, a 3-credit course that will be scheduled into the student's spring course load
  • Attend all meetings with the course instructor in the preceding fall
  • Enrolled students commit to a full year of thesis advisement
  • A cumulative GPA of at least 3.5
  • Completion of a master's project with a grade of at least A-
  • Students receive P/F in the fall; they cannot get a grade for the thesis until after they have handed it in by the end of the spring session
  • Students apply in the spring semester of their penultimate year of the program
  • All students must seek the approval of their advisors before they register for EDU 5314
  • Advisors should ascertain that students have a minimum 3.5 GPA and that students are not on probation before approving registration for EDU 5314

*Please note that Online MA students are not eligible to complete honors thesis projects.

Grades:
D (Fail)
C (Pass)
B (Pass with Distinction)
A (Pass with Distinction and Honor)

8. Building a Community of Educators

Experiential Jewish Education at The Davidson School

Experiential learning as an approach to Jewish education has the ability both to strengthen one's Jewish literacy (literacy broadly defined as knowledge and understanding of Jewish content) and to create strong, positive emotional bonds with Jewish life. Further, this approach can take place anywhere, both inside and outside the classroom. Gaining an understanding and mastery of experiential Jewish education (EJE) requires considerable training and study.  Drawing upon cutting-edge thinking in experiential Jewish education, all students at The Davidson School learn key ideas and best practices in teaching, experiential education methodologies, and leadership skills for a variety of settings: day schools, summer camps, Jewish community centers, congregational schools, and nonprofit organizations with a focus on Jewish education. 

Upon graduation, all Davidson School students will:

  • Participate in informational interviews with professionals in the field, supervised by their academic advisors and the program coordinator of the Experiential Learning Initiative
  • Engage in EJE in action through learning led by field professionals and field-trips such as visits to the Museum of Jewish Heritage, The Jewish Museum, Eden Village Camp, and other settings exemplifying EJE (these visits will occur on Fridays, weekends, and class times)
  • Work on a portfolio of growth that will demonstrate professional growth and increased understandings and expertise of EJE
  • Attend conferences and workshops external to The Davidson School, bringing back their learning and reflections and connecting them to their learning at JTS
  • Receive ongoing support, guidance, and career development related to EJE from the program coordinator of the Experiential Learning Initiative and faculty members  

Liturgical Interpreters Project

Every Monday from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m., first-year students meet for the Liturgical Interpreters Project. The project is designed to prepare our graduate students to become dynamic prayer leaders and teachers in a variety of communal settings. The Davidson School strives to guide participants in cultivating an awareness of and sensitivity to the power and depths of Jewish prayer. Every Jewish educator requires a treasury of ritual competencies in order to serve the religious and spiritual needs of the Jewish community. The Liturgical Interpreters Project includes three facets: basic knowledge content of key Jewish liturgy, the ability to chant and lead the liturgy in Hebrew, and a willingness to reflect upon the educational implications of our liturgy. Read more about the importance of prayer under Minyan, below.

Minyan

Prayer is one of the primary activities of Jewish engagement, and we as emerging Jewish educators need to know how to pray and transmit the traditional liturgy. In addition, we need to know what a prayer means, its history, and relevance. The Davidson School is unique in that it is comprised of students from across the spectrum of denominational affiliation. We have the opportunity to pray from multiple siddurim in order to experience the traditions and liturgies from different perspectives, and our prayer space is egalitarian. Although we will explore different modalities of prayer such as meditation and movement, our learning minyan is designed to provide students with an understanding of the rudimentary structure and flow of the prayers. The goal of the project is for students to become proficient in prayers as both participants and leaders.

*Minyan attendance is required for all first-year, full-time education students. For more information, contact Rabbi Jonathan Lipnick and Dr. Sarah Tauber.

Mifgash

Mifgash means meeting, and all full-time, first-year students are required to attend the weekly Mifgash. Mifgash takes place every Monday from 12:15 to 1:15 p.m.

Mifgash sessions are dedicated to conversations about professional goals and aspirations of emerging professionals. The First-Year Mifgash series is an opportunity for the first-year students to meet as a cohort in a weekly forum for community building and reflection on what it means to be an emerging Jewish educator.

In the first semester, the focus of Mifgash is on building community, preparation for the Visions and Voices of Israel seminar, and getting comfortable in New York City. The second semester focus is on identity as a Jewish educator. Additionally, during the first semester, students focus on crafting a personal mission statement as they review their pasts in order to determine their futures as Jewish educators.

Participants in the Mifgash are awarded practicum credit hours during the year that they are enrolled in their field placement equivalent to the number of hours they participate in the Mifgash.

For more information about the Mifgash, contact Rabbi Jonathan Lipnick.

Lunch and Learns

Most Tuesdays from 1:00 to 2:15 p.m., Davidson School students gather together for community time and Lunch and Learn sessions. 

9. Visions and Voices of Israel Seminar

One of the greatest challenges to contemporary world Jewry is the question of the place of Israel in Diaspora Jewish identity. The Davidson School recognizes that in order to enable its students to truly grapple with the complex issues at the heart of this challenge, Israel and Zionism must be a central component in students' experiences throughout the MA program.

To that end, every first-year Davidson School student is required to spend a portion of his or her first winter-semester break in Israel. The Visions and Voices of Israel Seminar is an educational experience in Israel in which our students are confronted with the questions about Israel with which every contemporary Jewish educator must engage.

2014–2015 Academic Year: Visions and Voices of Israel Seminar begins on January 4, 2015, and ends on January 15, 2015.

The seminar has three themes woven through it:

  • Israel-Diaspora relations: Why is Israel important to us as Diaspora Jews? What does it mean to be a Zionist today? What should our relationship be with Israel as Jews in the United States? How does Israel play its part in our Jewish identity?
  • Educational visions in Israel: What are some of the different educational visions that Israeli institutions and programs are developing? How do these visions of Jewish education relate to visions we might have for our institutions and programs? What conversations about vision can American Jewish educators and Israeli educators have?
  • Engaging with Israel: What different modes are there of visiting Israel? How do we talk about Israel with our students in America? What is the Israel that we should be exposing them to? What kinds of engagement with Israel should we be trying to engender in our students? How can we get our students to engage with the complexity of Israel?

In addition to these three themes, an underlying goal of the seminar is to build the Davidson School student community. Students and faculty work together to become a reflective, learning group of colleagues and friends, sharing wisdom, ideas, practices, hopes, and dreams with each other. The seminar requires participants to create, teach, and work together.

The seminar is based in Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, and in the southern and northern parts of Israel. During orientation and the fall semester, students receive more information about the program. The cost of the trip is underwritten in its entirety by The Davidson School; students pay for a few lunches and dinners during free time.

The Visions and Voices of Israel Seminar is a required part of the Davidson School curriculum for full-time students. If there are extreme extenuating circumstances that would make attendance on the trip a true hardship, students can apply to the associate dean of The Davidson School for an exemption. Students should be aware, though, that The Davidson School views the seminar attendance with utmost importance, and will only grant exemptions in exceptional circumstances.

Dual MA Degree Opportunities

MA in Jewish Education and MA in an Area of Jewish Studies

Davidson School students may, after their first semester of study, apply to The Graduate School of The Jewish Theological Seminary for an MA in any field of Jewish studies. (However, Davidson School students must have completed Hebrew 5203 by the time they matriculate into The Graduate School.)

A student may apply 9 credits of Judaica from a Davidson School transcript toward The Graduate School's credit requirements, subject to the approval of The Graduate School academic advisor. Likewise, students enrolled in The Graduate School (upon completion of all Graduate School prerequisites and Hebrew requirements) may apply for the MA in Jewish Education through The Davidson School, and count 9 credits of subject-area Judaica from the Graduate School transcript toward the Davidson School MA.

MA in Jewish Education and Rabbinic Ordination

In order to receive the MA in Jewish Education, rabbinical students take 18 non-duplicative education credits and complete a practicum:

  • EDU 5127: Foundations of Jewish Education
  • EDU 5116: Developmental Issues in Jewish Education
  • EDU 5158: Curriculum and Program Implementation
  • EDU/PHI 5525: Translating Jewish Theology
  • EDU/LIT 5055: Teaching Prayer or another curriculum-design course
  • EDU 5559: Staff Development and Supervision in Jewish Educational Settings

Students who would like to be in the Day School Teaching concentration need to take an additional curriculum-design course instead of EDU 5559.

Practicum

Students are required to complete a two-semester practicum consisting of either 16 hours of fieldwork experience per week, if choosing Day School Teaching concentration, or 10 hours of fieldwork experience per week, if choosing the Educational Leadership in Synagogue and Communal Settings concentration. The practicum takes place within each student's area of concentration. Practicum placements are arranged only by the faculty practicum coordinators. Students receive a stipend during the two semesters of the practicum.

The courses required prior to the practicum are EDU 5031: Pedagogic Skills (a requirement of The Rabbinical School), EDU 5127, and EDU 5158.

EDU 5559 and EDU 5609: Leading and Managing Jewish Nonprofit Organizations (a requirement of The Rabbinical School) can be taken concurrently with the practicum.

Contact Associate Dean Ofra Backenroth about dual MA degree opportunities. 

View the course grid (PDF).

View the application.

MA in Jewish Education and Cantorial Investiture

Cantorial students who apply for the MA in Jewish Education will be required to pass Hebrew requirements according to their concentration selection in addition to their Hebrew requirements for the H. L. Miller Cantorial School and College of Jewish Music. In order to receive the MA in Jewish Education, cantorial students must take the following 19 education credits:

  • EDU 5031: Pedagogic Skills
  • EDU 5127: Foundations of Jewish Education
  • EDU 5116: Developmental Issues in Jewish Education: Childhood or equivalent
  • EDU 5158: Curriculum and Program Implementation
  • Two education electives at the 5000 level
  • 12 concentration credits
  • 15 Judaica credits, 12 of which may be transferred in from the H. L. Miller Cantorial School transcript. These 15 Judaica credits must include the courses:
    • EDU/PHI 5525: Translating Jewish Theology
    • EDU/LIT 5055: Teaching Prayer or another curriculum-design course

Practicum

Students are required to complete a two-semester practicum consisting of either 16 hours of fieldwork experience per week, if choosing Day School Teaching concentration, or 10 hours of fieldwork experience per week, if choosing the Educational Leadership in Synagogue and Communal Settings concentration. The practicum takes place within each student's area of concentration. Practicum placements are arranged only by the faculty practicum coordinators. Students receive a stipend during the two semesters of the practicum.

The courses required prior to or concurrent with registration for the practicum are listed above.

Contact Associate Dean Ofra Backenroth about dual MA degree opportunities.  

View the course grid (PDF).

View the application.

Additional MA Program Opportunities

Graduates of List College entering the Davidson School MA Program

Graduates of List College and American Jewish University in Los Angeles, California, are permitted to apply 3 credits of graduate-level education course work and 9 credits of graduate-level Judaica courses from the BA transcript toward the MA in Jewish Education. Each student must meet with the dean of each school and the area advisor to determine exactly what combination of elective and major credits toward the BA will be accepted for the MA, and what additional course work will be required.

Part-Time MA Students

Part-time students cover the same 46 credits of comprehensive curriculum as their full-time colleagues. Designation as a part-time student is granted upon admission, and students must take 6 credits (two courses) each semester. In rare cases, students may change status from full-time to part-time and vice versa with the permission of the Dean's Office.

  • All part-time students must take two courses per semester and remain in good academic standing. In rare instances, part-time students may take more or fewer than two courses with the permission of the Dean's Office.
  • Upon graduation, students are expected to work in a Jewish setting for one year for each year that they received a fellowship, up to three years.
  • Fellowship money will automatically be renewed annually for two additional years beyond the first year, provided the student is in good academic standing and there are funds available.
  • Part-time students are encouraged, but not required, to participate in the Davidson School Mifgash, the Visions and Voices of Israel Seminar, and the Davidson School Liturgical Interpreters Project.

Online Master's Degree

Participants in the online program cover the same 46 credits of comprehensive curriculum as their colleagues who study at our New York City campus, but take the majority of their courses via the Internet. Students are accepted into the school with an Online MA designation and are also designated as part-time students. In rare instances, in-house students may change their status to become Online MA students with the permission of the Dean's Office. In addition to online work, students take a minimum of four courses at our New York City campus. These courses may be completed over two or more intensive one-month summer sessions or during the academic year.

Online Practicum

Students who hold a full-time position and are unable to take to be placed in a practicum site take an online practicum. Students register to EDU 5513D in the fall, and EDU 5514D in the spring.

Students are required to successfully complete the following courses before enrolling in the practicum of their choice.

  • EDU 5031: Pedagogic Skills
  • EDU 5127: Foundation of Jewish Education
  • EDU 5116: Developmental Issues in Jewish Education
  • EDU 5158: Curriculum and Program Implementation

Through the online practicum, students choose an aspect of practice around which to develop an in-depth investigation, using an action research framework. Action research is a reflective research process used as a tool to promote action taking in the service of educational improvement. It calls upon practitioners as insider experts to investigate research questions developed from their own concerns, and to focus these efforts around planning, implementing, and evaluating a change effort, thus enhancing leadership skills.  Students plan and facilitate a change effort in their home institutions.  

In the first semester of the course, students concentrate on developing a research question, writing a literature review, and completing a research design. In the second semester, students implement the project, collect data, and evaluate the action. Throughout the course, students are engaged in online conversation with their classmates in full and small groups to examine examples of action research. They act as a community of practice to share their progress and to offer feedback throughout the different stages of the process.

Hebrew for Online Students

The Davidson School does not offer online Hebrew courses. Students are encouraged to make their own arrangements in their local area (and/or to take the intensive Hebrew course offered on campus in the summer). However, students are required to take JTS Hebrew exams to demonstrate proficiency at each level. It is important to remember that, since online students are not taking Hebrew on campus, they cannot expect to have the same experience and cover exactly the same material as the in-house students. 

To this end, we provide online students with resources to support their work. These resources can be found on Blackboard on the Community page, under "Hebrew for Online Students" in the Content section:

  1. Course Syllabi 
  2. Suggested Resources  

Please note that the textbook for Foundations of Hebrew and Hebrew up to and including HEB5203 is Hebrew from Scratch, volumes 1 and 2.   

Students should consult with their advisors on how and when to fulfill the requirements in Hebrew.

More Information on Hebrew for Online Students

Taking "final" exams: Final exams for each level of Hebrew will be available to online students only on the day that they are administered to in-house students by the Hebrew faculty.

Funding for Online Learning Students

Online Learning students receive the same generous fellowships as onsite students.

  • Upon graduation, students are expected to work in a Jewish setting for one year for each year that they received a fellowship, up to three years.
  • Fellowship money will automatically be renewed annually for two additional years beyond the first year, provided the student is in good academic standing and there are funds available.
  • Online Learning students are not required to participate in The Davidson School's Visions and Voices of Israel Seminar. However, students who wish to attend the Israel seminar may request admission and will be able to attend if sufficient funding is available. Students wishing to join this trip must participate in the preparatory meetings associated with it.
  • Online MA students are encouraged but not required to participate in Davidson School Mifgash.
  • Please note that Online MA students are not eligible to complete honors thesis projects.

If an Online MA student is unable to take courses in a given semester because he or she has taken all the classes offered, he or she should register for continuous registration instead of registering for a leave of absence.

View the Online MA course grid (PDF).

Studying at Other Institutions

Consortium Agreement

All Davidson School students are eligible to take courses at Teachers College with the approval of their advisors.

Instructions for Registering at Teachers College

Register to all Teachers College (TC) courses through the JTS Office of the Registrar and follow these instructions (PDF)

Summer Study

Courses offered during the Summer Sessions may be used to fulfill program requirements. Summer school is also open to graduate students in Jewish studies and related fields from other academic institutions. For information and application forms, contact the Summer Sessions Office at (212) 678-8886. The Davidson School's MA fellowships do not cover summer school.

See Academic Standards for The Davidson School.